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RCM 3.2 Policies
ABSTRACT:
RCare Mobile (RCM) version 3.2.0 was released on 10/15/19. This version of RCM addresses all known issues in addition to solidifying the platform and adding new functionality. There is one potential issue that remains in the software. This issue can be avoided by following existing RCM polices.
TECH SUMMARY:
RCM 3.2.0 contains a known path to a state where RCM phones will not receive alerts. If the policies below are followed this path can easily be avoided.
Path to error:
If an RCM phone loses Wi-Fi connection while the phone is in Do Not Disturb Mode and an alert is triggered during that outage the phone will not receive the alert until the phone is manually activated.
Related Policies:
Do Not Disturb Mode: Do Not Disturb Mode should not be used at any time. Please train staff to never lower the volume below the “Vibrate” setting. [Do Not Disturb is the lowest level in the volume settings accessible via the “rocker” switch on the side of the phones.] Note: If the phone is in Do Not Disturb Mode and on Wi-Fi an alert will pull the phone out of Do Not Disturb and “wakes up” the device.
Log-in/Log-Out: 
The Log-in and Log-Out features of RCM not only allow for efficient management and reporting of staffing hours but also drive back-end functionality. For both reasons staff need to be trained to log out of RCM when leaving Wi-Fi for planned breaks, meals etc. If the building has known Wi-Fi “dead spots” staff need to be trained to manually activate the phone and confirm connection to Wi-Fi.
Wi-Fi Connectivity: 
RCM functions on a dedicated Wi-Fi network. Clinical staff need to be made aware of any deficiencies in coverage, strength etc. that may affect the phones connection to said dedicated Wi-Fi. Although 3.2.0 has added an audible notification when Wi-Fi is lost, if staff plan to leave Wi-Fi for extended periods they should be following the log in/out policy above. Note: If the RCM app is unlocked users can select other networks. An RCM phone on the wrong network is the same as that phone not being on Wi-Fi at all. Phones should be locked after install and the RCM phones should only “know” the appropriate nurse call Wi-Fi SSIDs.
Log-in/Log-Out: 
The Log-in and Log-Out features of RCM not only allow for efficient management and reporting of staffing hours but also drive back-end functionality. For both reasons staff need to be trained to log out of RCM when leaving Wi-Fi for planned breaks, meals etc. If the building has known Wi-Fi “dead spots” staff need to be trained to manually activate the phone and confirm connection to Wi-Fi.
Wi-Fi Connectivity: 
RCM functions on a dedicated Wi-Fi network. Clinical staff need to be made aware of any deficiencies in coverage, strength etc. that may affect the phones connection to said dedicated Wi-Fi. Although 3.2.0 has added an audible notification when Wi-Fi is lost, if staff plan to leave Wi-Fi for extended periods they should be following the log in/out policy above. Note: If the RCM app is unlocked users can select other networks. An RCM phone on the wrong network is the same as that phone not being on Wi-Fi at all. Phones should be locked after install and the RCM phones should only “know” the appropriate nurse call Wi-Fi SSIDs.
CONCLUSION:
If any or all of the above policies are followed the path to not receiving alerts can easily be avoided. The primary solutions/takeaways are:
● Do Not Disturb Mode: Train staff on how Do Not Disturb Mode is activated and ensure they don’t enter or use that mode.
● Checking the Phone when reentering Wi-Fi: In situations where temporary Wi-Fi outages can’t be avoided (e.g. elevators, stairwells etc.) train staff to manually check their phone for alerts when reentering good Wi-Fi.
hotel safety devices

The hotel industry is making great strides in protecting the safety of its workers. Cities and states have begun requiring hotels to provide their staff, especially those who work alone, such as housekeepers, with Employee Safety Devices (ESDs) for summoning help. 

Many more employees will be protected thanks to the hotel groups that have committed to the “5-Star Promise,” new safety standards for staff that includes a stipulation to “provide hotel employees with employee safety devices to help them feel safe on the job.

The results are promising, according to Security Magazine. In just one year, the number of hotel brands that have agreed to participate in the 5-Star Promise has increased from 17 to 56. That encompasses approximately 20,000 hotels employing over a million staff who will be protected.

Given the large percentage of hotel workers who have been threatened or harassed on the job (more than half, according to a survey of hotel workers in Chicago), this is a welcome development. 

So, what’s the problem? Hotels need to choose a safety system that will actually work to keep employees safe.

The city of Miami Beach is a case in point. Last year it passed an ordinance requiring safety devices for hotel employees. But, according to the Miami Herald, some hotels in the city have  simply provided workers with hand-held noisemakers, hoping to satisfy the law, which states that safety devices must “effectively summon prompt assistance to the employee’s location by a hotel or hostel security officer.”

Why Noisemakers Don’t Make the Safety Cut:

Will a simple noisemaker actually protect a housekeeper working alone on a floor? Probably  not. Even if other staff are working in the vicinity, the sound-deadening in the walls between rooms will likely prevent them from hearing the alarm. If security personnel don’t happen to be within hearing range, they are unlikely to know that help is needed. What’s more, the devices are easy to muffle or disarm, and even if heard, they may not be recognized as a call for help. Worse yet, a noisy alarm could “result in more physical harm to the employee” when the perpetrator tries to silence it or take it from the housekeeper, according to hospitality industry consultant Larry Mogelonsky.

What’s more, with noisemakers, it would be nearly impossible to know where to send help, who needs it, and whether it is still needed.

To truly protect hotel workers, alerts from hotel safety devices must reach hotel security, and must include location information, so that help can be sent quickly, and to the right place. The alerts must use a transmission protocol that works in buildings of any and all size and density. And they must convey location information 3-dimensionally, with both the floor of the hotel, and the location on the floor, where the help is needed. 

The city of Miami Beach followed up with a letter to the hotels within its city’s limits, clarifying the law. “Devices such as ‘noisemakers’ do not meet the requirements set forth in the ordinance, as they simply emit loud noise and do not disclose the location of the employee in need of prompt assistance,” the letter said. 

In case of an emergency, you want to ensure that everyone in your building feels protected and safe. RCare’s wireless ALP Hospitality Suite can help. This reliable and durable hotel crisis system uses military-grade RF, a signal protocol proven to be far more reliable than WiFi or Bluetooth, to ensure every alert is received. It has a wide listening range, even in the oldest buildings with challenging infrastructure. It uses Advanced Locating Protocol (ALP) to send location information with every call, so valuable time isn’t wasted determining where help is needed.

Want to know more about hotel duress systems? Contact RCare to find out how they can enhance safety and security for your hospitality staff.

Join RCare at 2019 LeadingAge

LeadingAge is an enormous gathering of not-for-profit organizations across the entire field of aging services. It is designed for participants to think, to learn, to network and to grow. This year, the attendees are challenged to imagine the future of aging with the theme: “What if?”

We love this theme. RCare has always pushed the boundaries of what a nurse call system can do and we’ve continued to innovate with the phrase “what if” in mind.

What if your nurse call system could help you with resident satisfaction? What if it could help with staff retention? What if it could give you actionable data to help with QAPI? What if it could save your staff time by integrating with other systems you’re already using for wander management, door access, or records? What if it could save you money by working with your existing hardware? What if it could bring you powerful features, no matter what your size or budget?

You see, we have been thinking about this for a while. And we are inspired:

What if RCare gave you super powers? What if your response times became super response times?

This year at the LeadingAge Annual Meeting & Expo, RCare has a challenge for your community: “improve response times and improve your resident experience”.

What is the average response time for your community? Do you know? Can you measure it? Is it improving?

You can’t manage what you don’t measure.

Everyone in the community benefits when response times improve. RCare gives you the power to look at your response times and make the change. When you do, you will start to see immediate benefits.

What if we vowed to build a solution customized to your needs?

What if we made it affordable?

What if we made it an easy choice?

No matter what kind of community, no matter what your size or budget, RCare can help. Stop by Booth #1624 and talk to RCare about how RCare’s advanced nurse call systems can empower you to make big improvements in your response times. And while you’re there, take your photo and post it on Twitter or Facebook with the hashtag #RMan or #RWoman for your chance to win great prizes.

2019 LeadingAge Annual Meeting & Expo
October 27-30, 2019
San Diego Convention Center
San Diego, CA
#LeadingAge19

RCare Booth #1624
Facebook: @rcareinc
Twitter: @ResponseCare
#LeadingAge19, #RMan, #RWoman

Expo Times/Dates:
Monday, October 28, 11:30am – 3:30pm
Tuesday, October 29, 12:00 – 3:30pm
Wednesday, October 30, 9:30 – 11:30am

Emergency Pendants For SeniorsMy mom isn’t vain, but she does take pride in her appearance. She always has. It never occurred to me that one day it might put her in danger.

Even though she lives in an independent living 65+ community, I still  worry about her. When she started having dizzy spells I took her to the doctor and they adjusted her blood pressure medication. But I wanted her to have one of those push button things, too. You know, the “I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” buttons. I wanted to know that if she fell or had a problem, all she needed to do was push a button and help would be on the way. So I spoke to the people running the community. Turns out, they do have such buttons and I arranged for Mom to get one.  

The problem was getting her to wear it. At first I thought it was just forgetfulness, but it was limited to this one issue. Every time I picked her up for lunch or dropped in for a visit, she never had it on. When I reminded her, she would apologize and go put it on. But the next time I saw her it would be the same: She didn’t have it on.

That’s when it hit me. Mom wasn’t wearing it because she didn’t like how it looked. And who could blame her? It really was kind of ugly. And it must have felt like wearing a sign that reads “I’m old and frail.” But I kept telling her that if she doesn’t wear it, it won’t do her any good. She seemed to be far less worried than I.

I didn’t know what to do. I felt scared and worried. If mom refused this, I thought about switching her level of care, which she would not like and would be very expensive. So, one last time I went back to the staff and asked for their recommendation. Their response was amazing. Turns out they’d just received new push button pendants from RCare called Pretty Pretty Pendants. They said it might be just right for mom. When I saw them, I had to agree. They looked like they were designed for my mom. They are fully functioning push-button pendants, but the design is sleek, flawless and beautiful, elegant enough to wear as a necklace.

As I suspected I presented the necklace to mom and she loved it. She instantly put it on and it looked amazing, like she does. She wears it with pride, knowing she looks great and I feel great knowing there is that extra safety net.  

Now when I go visit her it’s always on. Every time. Thank you RCare. Pretty Pretty Pendants are pretty great!

RCare's Hotel Duress System for hotel worker safety

New Jersey has become the very first state to require panic buttons for hotel worker safety, a major win for the state’s hospitality industry.

For many hotel employees, the threat of violence or harassment is a serious risk, especially when working alone. “Sometimes it’s a long floor of rooms, and you may be the only one working there,” according to a Tropicana housekeeper.

Support for the law soared after a 2018 sexual assault of a staff housekeeper by a Bally’s Casino guest, according to NBC News. The guest, a 51-year-old male, pushed the female employee into a room and assaulted her.

Hotel employees have reported numerous instances of assault, attempted assault, and harassment. The threat is not always from guests. A housekeeper at Caesars reported that she once attempted to service a guest room, only to open the door to two charging dogs.

Governor Phil Murphy explained in a statement reported in USA Today, “We must protect the safety of workers in the hospitality industry. This new law will ensure that hotel employees performing their duties will have the means to summon immediate assistance if they are in danger.”

The new law requires that any employee who works alone in a hotel with more than 25 guest rooms must be provided with a panic button to carry or wear at work.

How do hotel duress systems work?

Employees are provided with a push button pendant to wear on their wrist or a lanyard, or carry in a pocket. When the button is pressed, it transmits the signal wirelessly to a central station, typically in the hotel’s security headquarters. The most effective systems include the location of the call, and information about who requested help.

RCare, Inc. is the maker of the wireless Hospitality Suite. This reliable and durable hotel crisis system uses military-grade RF, a signal protocol proven to be far more reliable than WiFi or Bluetooth, to ensure every alert is received. It has a wide listening range, even in the oldest buildings with challenging infrastructure. It uses Advanced Locating Protocol (ALP) to send location information with every call, so valuable time isn’t wasted determining where help is needed.

While New Jersey is the first state to mandate hotel duress systems, several cities, including Sacramento, Long Beach, and Chicago, have passed similar laws, and a few major hotel firms have taken the lead in proactively providing these devices for their employees’ safety.

In case of an emergency, you want to ensure that everyone in your building feels protected and safe. RCare’s wireless ALP Hospitality Suite can help. Want to know more about hotel duress systems? Contact RCare to find out how they can enhance the safety and security for your hospitality staff.